Chai Ling Leads Students in a Moment of Silence for Hit-and-Run Toddler

Chai Ling, two-time Nobel Prize nominee and former leader of the 1989 Tiananmen Square Student Democracy Movement, will address students at the Boston Asian American Students Intercollegiate Conference (BAASIC) this Saturday about responsibility that comes with freedom: We must care for others.

 

Her new memoir, A Heart for Freedom, was released this month.  Ling will briefly share her life story, obstacles she overcame as an Asian-American immigrant, and a critical call of for students in this century: ending gendercide.

 

This week, Chinese citizens mourn the loss of toddler Yue Yue, who was run over twice by vans last Thursday but ignored by passersby.  Yue Yue, pronounced brain dead after the accident, died Friday. Her unnecessary death was caught on tape, and the lack of compassion by bystanders has sparked a wave of “soul-searching” throughout the Chinese community. 

 

Ling will lead students in a moment of silence to remember Yue Yue when she addresses Boston’s young Asian American population this Saturday. 

 

“Yue Yue could still be alive,” says Chai Ling,   “But 18 people walked on by.   Students, America is more than a land of freedom to achieve and succeed.  America is place where we are free to care for others, to wake up the heartless to be a voice for the voiceless, and we must do so.”

 

“In China, girls are being eliminated by prenatal sex selection and abandonment and everybody knows this is happening. Every day, baby girls are being left by the side of the road abandoned, and yet most of us do not search our souls about this the way we did when Yue Yue was killed.  If we do not act to stand up for one in every 6 girls who are killed as a result of son-preference and the One-Child Policy, then we are no different from the 18 people who walked by.”

 

This is a hard message for students, but the students at BAASIC are ready for a challenge.  The theme of the conference is outlined on the website: “In this new age of tiger moms and paper tigers, we encounter questions that we must comprehend and incorporate into our effort to continue the struggle for equal opportunity, civil rights, and social and economic justice.”

 

“The problem of gendercide reaches to America’s shores,” says Ling.  “Gender ratios are imbalanced here too, but only in the Asian-American community.  You must be the leaders of tomorrow who will stand up to our own culture.  Love your daughters, keep your girls and stop the killing.  For years, American presidents have had 2 daughters, no sons, and it has been culturally acceptable.  Part of the American dream is allowing each girl to live.”

 

Ling is a mother of 3 daughters, and is very proud of them.

 

“We can honor Yue Yue by going out of our way to help others,” says Ling.  “As you continue to learn, grow and prosper in this land of freedom, take time daily to focus on those around you.  Then maybe tragedies like this can be avoided in the future."

 

Ling is the founder of All Girls Allowed, a Boston-based organization working in China to restore value to girls and mothers and to reveal the injustice of China’s One-Child Policy.  China has 37 million more men than women, and the imbalance worsens annually.

 

WHAT:   Special Address and Book-Signing with Chai Ling, Two-Time Nobel Prize Nominee and Former Commander-in-Chief of 1989 Tiananmen Square Student Movement

WHERE: BAASIC Conference, Harvard University, 59 Shepard Street, Cambridge, MA 02138.

WHEN: Saturday, Oct. 21, 2011, at 10:30 a.m.







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