All Girls Allowed Celebrates Two Years of Rescues in China

 

Today on China’s Children’s Day, All Girls Allowed celebrates two years of answered prayer that saw the rescues of women and the reunions of families torn apart by China’s One-Child Policy.

 

“We trust that a day is coming when China’s daughters will no longer carry the oppressive burden of the One-Child Policy,” said Chai Ling, founder of the Boston-based nonprofit.  “And we pray that day will come soon.” Most recently, Chai Ling prayed in a congressional hearing for the safe release activist Chen Guangcheng; four days later, Chen and his family were on a plane bound for New York.

 

Since its founding on June 1, 2010, All Girls Allowed has welcomed a strong base of volunteers and supporters who share in the core mission: revealing the injustice of China’s One-Child Policy and restoring life, value, and dignity to girls and mothers.  To date, 21 trafficked girls and women have been reunited with their families.  Supporters sponsored more than 1,200 mothers as they bore and raised daughters in villages where gender ratios were deeply skewed towards boys. 25 orphaned girls received tuition for their studies in primary school, secondary school, or college.

 

None of these results would have been possible without the strong support of our patrons and volunteers, who are guided in their work by an enduring belief in the teachings of Jesus Christ.

 

Just two weeks ago, an All Girls Allowed volunteer in China managed to reunite four trafficked women with their families. These women were sold as girls to become child brides, and they were cut off from their parents. When the volunteer reported the news, he was brought to tears by the emotion of witnessing such an event.  Zhen, one of the women who was reunited with her parents two weeks ago because of the work of our volunteer in China, was sold as a young child. The family who bought Zhen raised her alongside their son and tried to force her to marry him when she was sixteen. She had to escape by jumping out of a window and running away to another city—were she had to fend for herself without an education. Zhen was elated to meet her parents and said she wants to write a book about the trafficking of child brides.

 

Stories like these fill All Girls Allowed with hope. Yet we know more must be done before gendercide and the One-Child Policy end—and before women in China experience true freedom.

 

 “Gendercide can only happen when women are undervalued,” Ling said. “We are building a network of volunteers who will follow Jesus in loving and honoring women, even when doing so is countercultural.” 

 

As part of this renewed effort, All Girls Allowed plans to expand the scale of its rescue operations and consolidate its work at the Boston headquarters.  Executive Director Brian Lee said the planned shift will bring the organization one step closer to ending gendercide.

 

“The problems that women in China face are far too big to be ended by any single organization. They will require a movement, and that movement will require prayer, ” Lee said. “We will continue to bring each effort before Jesus in prayer, knowing that he will unite us, humble us, and give us a spirit of grace—even for those who enforce the One-Child Policy.”







More News

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Wednesday, September 25th, marks the 33rd anniversary of China's One-Child Policy, a policy that has taken the lives of countless individuals and torn apart the fabric of Chinese society.  All Girls Allowed is calling on followers of Jesus all around the world to commit this day to the Lord through prayer and fasting, asking him to swiftly bring an end to the twin evils of gendercide and coercive family planning.

 

Under the One-Child Policy, nearly two-thirds of Chinese couples (more than 900 million people) are allowed...

[GRAPHIC IMAGE: To view unblurred photograph, click here.]

 

CHUZHOU, Anhui, China—The graphic photograph of an aborted 7-month boy is widely circulating China’s internet waves following a forced abortion that took place on March 22, 2013, in Chuzhou City, Anhui Province.

 

Ms. Lü, a 33-year-old Chinese woman whose husband reported the case and released...

 

 

Boston, MA—We have received some great questions about what the document issued to family planning offices might mean for women facing forced and coerced abortions in China.  (We usually speak of “forced” abortion as the violent act of dragging a woman to undergo an abortion; a “coerced” abortion involves the use of economic, social or other threats to pressure a woman to agree to undergo an abortion.)

 

Since speaking with the official in Chongqing about the directive banning forced late-term abortion, we have discovered that the...