.
IMAGE: All Girls Allowed

 

For many Chinese women, keeping a daughter is a battleand the stakes are unthinkably high.

 

A Chinese woman may not become pregnant without the government’s permission. Under China’s One-Child Policy, all couples must apply for a birth permit before starting a pregnancy. Nearly two-thirds of Chinese couples (more than 900 million people) may have only one child and will be issued only one birth permit in their lives. Pregnancy without a permit is illegal.

 

If an illegal pregnancy is discovered, the mother has two choices: abort the baby or pay an unbearable fine. Chinese data...

.
IMAGE: MSN

 

 

For decades, China has shrouded its severe human trafficking problem in silence. But the U.S. State Department’s 2013 Trafficking in Persons Report ended that silence last week, downgrading China to the worst possible rating, Tier 3. Thoroughly researched and brutally honest, the report exposes China’s failure to address primary causes of human trafficking, including the One-Child Policy. The report declares:

 

“The Government of the People’s Republic of China does not fully comply with the minimum standards for the...

.
See video

Share this video far and wide

 

The injustice of China's One-Child Policy has gone on long enough. It's time for us to walk in Jesus' freedom and together see the least of the least — China's girls and mothers — restored to life, value and dignity in Christ. It's time to simply love HER, in Jesus' name — the aborted baby girl, the abandoned daughter, the trafficked child, and the abused mother.

 

Join the work of All Girls Allowed in seeing God transform...

.

 

International media rejoiced together today at the rescue of 89 infants kidnapped in China.  But what should our response be to this news?

 

China Daily reported that the infants, ages 10 days to 4 months, were rescued by police and are now in the care of institutions.  The babies were to be sold on China’s ever-increasing ‘black market’ of stolen children. 

 

All Girls Allowed, a non-profit organization devoted to restoring life, value and dignity to girls and mothers in China, applauds this successful operation completed by Chinese officials.  The special task force set in place in February is already seeing success as a...

.

July 20, 2011

 

The ratio at birth between boys and girls continues to widen in China. Families in poor regions find it harder and harder to get brides for their sons. As a result, trafficking of girls had increased tremendously in the last several years.

 

During the AGA volunteer’s anti-trafficking campaigns, we found that the younger the boy, the easier he was to sell on the black market, and at higher prices. Conversely, the age at which girls were kidnapped had been increasing, and some of the girls were kidnapped in their teens. Older girls were worth more to traffickers and buyers because young girls require years of rearing before they can become brides . The price...

.

Congressional Testimony on June 13, 2011

 

Chai Ling testifies in Congress about the rise of trafficking in China. The One-Child Policy has contributed to a dearth of girls, so families with sons routinely try to buy a girl to raise as a future "bride" for their son. 


2,175 Stolen Children and the ‘Child Bride City’ of Putian: Exposing China’s Massive Trafficking Problem

 

Chai Ling, Founder of All Girls Allowed

 

House Committee on Foreign Affairs

Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, and Human Rights

 

Introduction: The One-Child Policy and the Child Bride...

.

 

Up to 600,000 child brides live in one Chinese city with a population of 3 million, reports humanitarian organization All Girls Allowed at a Congressional hearing Monday, June 13.  And this is just the tip of the iceberg.

 

All Girls Allowed sent field workers to study the city of Putian and its surrounding areas for months. “Almost every family has 7 or 8 ‘siblings’”, report the authors.  “Of these, at least a quarter have been trafficked.”  More on the problem of trafficking is available here: http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/category/topics/trafficking

 

...
.
Statement delivered by Dudley L. Poston, Jr., Ph.D., at a Congressional Press Conference on the topic of Gendercide in China on June 1, 2011.

 

Good afternoon. I am Dudley Poston, a sociology and demography professor at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. I am also an adjunct professor at three universities in China (Renmin University, Fuzhou University, and Nanjing Normal University). I have been teaching demography and conducting demographic research for almost 42 years. The past 19 years I have been a faculty member at Texas A&M in College Station; previously I was on the sociology faculties at the University of Texas at Austin for over 18 years and at...

.

 

Volunteers involved in anti-trafficking and anti-gendercide work with the humanitarian organization All Girls Allowed have been targeted by the Chinese government in a recent crackdown likely sparked by various Middle East protests and the peaceable Chinese “Jasmine Revolution”.

 

While uninvolved in these demonstrations, volunteers have been accused and detained by police.  An alarming example: Jiang Tianyong, a human rights lawyer who helped anti-trafficking volunteers as they reconnected a 3-year old child to her family just last...

.

January 17, 2011 

 

All Girls Allowed's anti-trafficking initiative sent out volunteers to dozens of counties and municipalities with pamphlets and information to find and help trafficked children.

 

On January 12th, after reading a pamphlet distributed by volunteers, a sympathetic local resident of Huguan County, Shanxi Province called the AGA hotline give a tip. A girl of 3, a victim of child trafficking, had been sold into the village.

 

With this information, All Girls Allowed (AGA) contacted Mr. Feng Jianlin of Shanxi, who has worked on a number of such cases, and is himself a parent of a missing child. Checking with information he gathered, Mr....