Some Chinese Officials Want to End One-Child Policy Too

Ahead of our day of prayer and fasting on Tuesday, March 5th, we wanted to share more information that suggests that the One-Child Policy’s days are numbered. As the important 12th National People’s Congress approaches, several Chinese government representatives have made public suggestions to change the One-Child Policy within the last several days. As you can see from the quotes below, there is a growing chorus of voices against the One-Child Policy because of its brutality and foolishness. Join with us as we ask God to bring an end to this terrible policy!

 

Wang Ming (pictured above) is a professor of Public Management at Tsinghua University, one of China’s most prestigious and oldest schools. Wang said that it is no longer time to discuss whether to change the One-Child Policy. Rather, it is now time to discuss how to change the policy.

 

Zhu Lieyu, a representative from Guangdong Province, suggests a Two-Child Policy, citing that the aging population is becoming increasingly problematic. The only child in the family has to carry so many burdens as a result. She also pointed out how lonely it is for those families who lost their only child, but who have already passed child-bearing age. Hunan Province representative Xue Kaiwu said that he had already submitted a proposal for the government to provide support for families who have lost their only child.

 

Another representative from the same province, He Youlin, mentioned that he had suggested a Two-Child Policy many times to the Family Planning Commission, but with no reply. He will use the occasion of the National People’s Congress to mention his suggestion again. He felt disrespected when he received no reply from the Family Planning Commission, and believes that the commission is causing more negative effects than positive ones in China.

 

Huang Xihua, a representative from Huizhou City, said that the government promised the One-Child Policy would only last 30 years, but it has already been 33 years. The government should keep its promise and end the One-Child Policy. Representative Li Lili said that it is the fundamental right of a citizen to choose their own method of contraception, and therefore it is time to correct this unreasonable policy. Representative Ni Huiying said that it is not fair that the government only gives a hukou (registration of citizenship) to the baby after the mother has completed sterilization surgery.

 

Ma Xu, Director of the Family Planning Science Research Bureau, suggested that some provinces might consider implementing the Two-Child Policy, depending on their economic and demographic circumstances.

 

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The information above was gathered from the following Chinese news articles and videos interviews:

 

News Articles:

 

 

Video Interviews:

 

 

by Kat Lewis, All Girls Allowed




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