New Report: Family Planning Fines in China Cripple Families

All Girls Allowed has released a data report on the fines established by each Chinese province’s family planning office. We see that the fines are prohibitively expensive—for a rural family in Hunan province, for instance, where the average annual rural salary is 6,567 RMB ($1,050 USD), a maximum fine would equal 45 years of income. Even the minimum fine would equal 4 years’ salary for a rural worker—still an impossible amount for many families who live from hand to mouth.

 

[See charts below for details.]

 

The weight of these fines leaves parents with little choice. They either submit to an abortion that they might not have otherwise chosen, or they do what a family in Guizhou did last week—sell the “extra” child to traffickers to avoid paying a fine. A 31-year-old father, knowing he faced a fine if he kept his second son, sold the newborn to a trafficking ring for 40,000 RMB ($6,400 USD). Provinces are also cracking down on one of the last remaining options by demanding that mothers who travel outside China to give birth pay a stiff fine upon their return.

 

by Kat Lewis, All Girls Allowed

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