Intern Testimony: Samantha

Meeting with the team before I began volunteering remotely was really great. I was able to get to know the staff a little bit more and also ask questions I had about what I needed to do. I felt welcomed from the beginning at All Girls Allowed and the information I received beforehand really helped me to understand my tasks and role as a member of team.

 

The work I've done with All Girls Allowed so far has matched my previous work experience exactly, while also giving me the freedom to make suggestions and stay up to date on the latest social networking strategies and changes. Social networking for All Girls Allowed has helped me grow professionally by providing a way for me to continue practicing and improving my marketing skills while working for a cause that I'm passionate about.

 

Samantha served as a social media campaign volunteers with All Girls Allowed.

 




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Summary

I have long been an admirer of Chinese art, particularly the tradition of paper-cutting as it is my primary method of working. A couple of years ago I started researching and reading into the one child policy, into what had been going on, and what continues to happen in China. With these two interests combined I felt compelled to create a piece of work which would not only explore the theme but would also expose the injustice to an unintentionally ignorant Western audience. Using the language of traditional Chinese symbolism and technique I created a large scale red paper...

 

Much of the research of All Girls Allowed has been supplemented by the excellent work of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China.

 

The Congressional-Executive Commission on China is a bipartisan organization dedicated to providing reliable research about China.  To view the most recent Annual Reports, please visit the following links:

 

2012 Annual Report:  http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CHRG-112shrg76190/pdf/CHRG-112shrg76190....

IMAGE: All Girls Allowed

 

When the bus arrived at our destination, I could hardly believe I was there. We stepped out and were asked to be as quiet as possible; not to speak, but to follow our guide. Creeping up the stairs slowly and quietly, we held our shoes in our hands. We'd been told China doesn't like large gatherings of people in homes. In fact, they are quite suspicious of it, so we had to be careful not to draw any attention to ourselves. To do this, once off the bus, we went upstairs in groups of three or four people, 10 to 15...