Family Planning Minister: One-Child Policy "Here to Stay"

January 16, 2013

 

According to Chinese sources, Wang Xia, the head of the National Population and Family Planning Committee—which oversees the enforcement of the One-Child Policy—has reaffirmed her commitment to coercive family planning.

 

This news comes despite deep concerns within China about the country's aging population, not to mention the gender imbalance fostered by the policy.

 

The South China Morning Post, a Hong Kong-based paper, reported Wang Xia's statement:

 

 

Measures to keep the national birth rate low are going to be around "for a long time", according to the top family planning official. She dismissed speculation the one-child policy would be scrapped this year.

However, Wang Xia said that authorities would gradually ease restrictions for certain people.

"The policy should be a long-term one, and its primary goal is to maintain a low birth rate and be gradually perfected," Wang, minister of the National Population and Family Planning Commission, said at a national conference, Xinhua reported.

Let's hope that pressure on the One-Child Policy will continue to turn the tide against it in China. Wang Xia's position in the government is not a strong one, and it may weaken if family planning policy is relaxed. (Perhaps this explains her resistance to any suggestion of the policy needing an overhaul.) But Wang Xia's stubborness will not silence the growing wave of concern about the policy within China.

(Image above: South China Morning Post)

 

by Kat Lewis, All Girls Allowed




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